Hot Core Pilates

For those of you who enjoy getting sweaty and steamy on the floor mat during strenuous hot Bikram yoga classes, there’s a new kid in town. Hot Core Pilates offers similarly bendy-bodied fun in a toasty chamber heated to 35 degrees Celsius, but this time classes are less focused on practicing calmly meditative Yoga poses, and more intent on developing core strength and muscle tone, and banishing chronic aches and pains.

Celebrities including Madonna, Jennifer Aniston, Miranda Kerr, Claire Danes and even David Beckham are devoted Pilates fans, and the hot version has even more health benefits than the classic chilled sort.
Where yoga – which originated in India about 5,000 – focuses on strength, flexibility and breathing to boost physical and mental well-being, Pilates – created by German-born Joseph Pilates in the early 1900s – is an exercise system that focuses on stretching and strengthening the whole body to improve balance, muscle-strength, flexibility and posture.

The main health benefits of Hot Core Pilates are:

  • Detoxification: sweating on a regular basis allows the body to release toxins and waste from within, providing room for vital nutrients and hydration. Be prepared to sweat in your hot Pilates class!
  • Healthy connective tissue:Pilates opens the body’s connective tissue. Hot Pilates enhances this process, allowing the body to stretch more fully, lubricate and renew, resulting in greater flexibility and energy
  • Boosts immunity: viruses cannot survive in high temperatures, so increasing the body’s core temperature fights infections, which are pushed out through the sweat. Practicing hot Pilates also increases the body’s production of white blood cells, which fight infection.
  • Weight Loss: stretching deeper builds more muscle, which burns more fat. Hot Pilates can result in weight loss. Diet also improves as the body craves healthier food when practicing regularly

The practice was initially adopted by professional dancers in the US as an effective form of recovery after injury, but is now practiced around the world.